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This week at Latitude 4/26

This week at Latitude 4/26

Hey everyone,

Strong start to the week, what a gorgeous morning.  Hope to see you out here flying!

  • Congratulations to Darcy M on passing her Private Checkride on Friday.  She was one of my first students last year, and has pressed through and persevered to achieve her goal.  CFI Dan Prudek prepared her well.  Good job guys!
  • FOUND: Small portable GPS unit, call to describe and claim.
  • Did you know?  I didn’t.  Apparently little things like Land and Hold Short and Line Up and Wait are not legal here at KCOE.  These are examples of “regulation by omission”.
    • It is established that normally only one aircraft is allowed to use a given runway at a time.  This is the rule of the day at uncontrolled airports.  LAHSO and LUAW are ATC overrides to this rule.
    • LAHSO and Line up and Wait are not legal at any uncontrolled airport, as these procedures are specifically described as ATC procedures… therefore ATC tower control is required in order to use them.
    • I have flown, and seen plenty of examples, of landing on a runway and holding short of the crossing runway here at COE.  The jets do this a TON, landing on runway 6, holding short of runway 2 for crossing traffic.  This is not legal.
    • I have flown, and watched, lining up on a runway behind departing traffic with an appropriate radio call.  This is not legal.
    • So what do we do?  Leave the runway to the aircraft arriving or departing… don’t try to share it.
      • If someone is landing on the crossing runway, be reasonable about not attempting to land or take off while the crossing runway is in use.
      • Lead by example.  Go around if someone attempts to use the crossing runway, it’s the legal option.  They may ask why… this gives you an opportunity to explain that “LAHSO is not legal at this airport”.
      • Don’t use LUAW.
  • A Champ Rusty Pilot and I had the privilege of visiting Timber Basin airpark, a little strip northeast of Sagle.  This is not a strip for the faint of heart, as it has a road about a third of the way down the runway, and the departure to the north is quite obstructed.  The runway also has a very unusual gradient profile, with a substantial rise midway through the runway.  Margin for error is slight, as each side of the roughly 40 ft wide runway has deep drainage ditches.  All that said (yikes!) it is a challenging landing and takeoff for mountain flying practice, and has a friendly population of pilots.  Take along a Latitude CFI to tackle this one, and enjoy a nice cup of coffee on the grass as your reward.
Keep it safe everyone!